100m-200m

The End Of Season Rest Periods Of The World’s Best Athletes

The End Of Season Rest Periods Of The World’s Best Athletes

Renato Canova: “There are not rules valid for all the athletes, and valid, for the same athletes, always in the same way. After a season, we can have a short RESTING period, before starting the TRANSITION period, which is already a period of training. In Kenya (and Africa generally), the resting period is something including FULL REST. We give, to every athlete, about 2 weeks of total rest, and in this period they don’t do any physical activity.”

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John Smith – Speed

John Smith – Speed

Maurice Greene, Ato Bolden, Jon Drummond, Inger Miller, Marie- Jose Perec – world record holders, Olympic champions, they all come to Los Angeles to work with him. Because John Smith has developed a radical approach to training sprinters. Actually, let me rephrase that: he’s developed a radical approach to how to think about training sprinters, that just seems to work better than anything else out there.

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Allyson Felix Training – Strength Routine (from 125lbs deadlift, to 270lbs deadlift in 7 months)

Allyson Felix Training – Strength Routine (from 125lbs deadlift, to 270lbs deadlift in 7 months)

“In September of 2002, we began high school sprinter Allyson Felix’s final assault on Marion Jones’ national high school 200-meter record. At the time, Allyson weighed 121 lbs. Allyson increased September’s 125 lbs deadlift to 270 lbs in mid-April and to an estimated 300 lbs by June. Her body weight increased a paltry 2 pounds from 121 lbs to 123 lbs. Meanwhile, her 200-meter sprint time dropped from 22.83 in 2003 to 22.11 in 2004.”

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What separates elite athletes from average athletes?

What separates elite athletes from average athletes?

What separates elite athletes from average athletes and average athletes from the general population has a lot to do with the efficiency of the motor control center of the brain and how quickly it can deliver messages to the muscles to perform certain movements. The good news is that an athlete can train his neuromuscular system resulting in better coordination and quicker movements.

read more
The End Of Season Rest Periods Of The World’s Best Athletes

The End Of Season Rest Periods Of The World’s Best Athletes

Renato Canova: “There are not rules valid for all the athletes, and valid, for the same athletes, always in the same way. After a season, we can have a short RESTING period, before starting the TRANSITION period, which is already a period of training. In Kenya (and Africa generally), the resting period is something including FULL REST. We give, to every athlete, about 2 weeks of total rest, and in this period they don’t do any physical activity.”

read more
John Smith – Speed

John Smith – Speed

Maurice Greene, Ato Bolden, Jon Drummond, Inger Miller, Marie- Jose Perec – world record holders, Olympic champions, they all come to Los Angeles to work with him. Because John Smith has developed a radical approach to training sprinters. Actually, let me rephrase that: he’s developed a radical approach to how to think about training sprinters, that just seems to work better than anything else out there.

read more
Allyson Felix Training – Strength Routine (from 125lbs deadlift, to 270lbs deadlift in 7 months)

Allyson Felix Training – Strength Routine (from 125lbs deadlift, to 270lbs deadlift in 7 months)

“In September of 2002, we began high school sprinter Allyson Felix’s final assault on Marion Jones’ national high school 200-meter record. At the time, Allyson weighed 121 lbs. Allyson increased September’s 125 lbs deadlift to 270 lbs in mid-April and to an estimated 300 lbs by June. Her body weight increased a paltry 2 pounds from 121 lbs to 123 lbs. Meanwhile, her 200-meter sprint time dropped from 22.83 in 2003 to 22.11 in 2004.”

read more
What separates elite athletes from average athletes?

What separates elite athletes from average athletes?

What separates elite athletes from average athletes and average athletes from the general population has a lot to do with the efficiency of the motor control center of the brain and how quickly it can deliver messages to the muscles to perform certain movements. The good news is that an athlete can train his neuromuscular system resulting in better coordination and quicker movements.

read more

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