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HALF MARATHON

What separates elite athletes from average athletes?

What separates elite athletes from average athletes?

What separates elite athletes from average athletes and average athletes from the general population has a lot to do with the efficiency of the motor control center of the brain and how quickly it can deliver messages to the muscles to perform certain movements. The good news is that an athlete can train his neuromuscular system resulting in better coordination and quicker movements.

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Australia’s #1 Distance Running Coach: Coaching Philosophy

Australia’s #1 Distance Running Coach: Coaching Philosophy

There aren’t too many coaches who have coached over 20 Olympians. Australian, Nic Bideau is one. His top athletes include Craig Mottram (3:48.9 Mile – Aus Record, 12:55 5000m – Aus Record), Ryan Gregson (3:31.0 1500m – Aus Record), Ben St Lawrence (27:24 10000m – Aus Record), Genevieve LaCaze (9:14 3000m SC), Sonia O’Sullivan (3:58 1500m – Ireland Record). Along with these national record holders, is another 15+ Olympians.

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Paula Radcliffe – Running Diet Advice

Paula Radcliffe – Running Diet Advice

“You need to eat protein, but where your source of protein is from is up to you. Everyone has their own reasons. What I do believe is that if you are happy and are sticking to what you believe in, you are then far healthier. So, whatever you believe in, go with that. Just make sure you are getting enough protein. Everyone always talks about carbohydrates for running, but you also need protein because you need to rebuild the muscles.” “I ate a lot of fish – I still do, some chicken and red meat about twice a week.”

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Ryan Hall (2:04:58 Marathon) – 3 Toughest Training Sessions

Ryan Hall (2:04:58 Marathon) – 3 Toughest Training Sessions

“Animal Style” Fartlek (14.9 miles / 24km)3 miles hard, 3 miles float, 2 miles hard, 2 miles float, 1 mile hard, 1 mile float, 1200m hard, 1200m float, 800m hard, 800m float, 400m hard, 400 float. Hall would regularly complete this session in the lead up to marathons, usually around once a month. He would also do this session on a challenging cross country course, with hills to break up his rhythm. This made the pacing difficult to note, however Hall would usually start his 3 mile (4.8km) effort at around 5:00-5:05/mi (≈3:07/km) if it was on the flat, his 2 mile (3.2km) effort at around 4:55/mi (3:03/km), his 1 mile (1.6km) effort at around 4:45/mi (2:58/km) and hold around the same pace for the 1200m, 800m and 400m; sometimes speeding up the final 400m to under 70seconds.Hall refers to this session as one of his tougher sessions and usually did it alone on the hills, making it even tougher for himself.

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Mo Farah’s Diet

Mo Farah’s Diet

The Sweat Elite team spent a month in Suluta, the running hub of Ethiopia at the same time Mo Farah was preparing for the London Marathon 2019.
When discussing diet with Mo Farah, he mentioned that he tends to eat a relatively large breakfast before training, as he commences his morning training session at around 9am. Farah mentioned that his stomach is able to process food quite quickly, so he usually eats breakfast around 30-40 minutes before training, which usually consists of 2 pieces of toast (multi grain bread) with jam and butter as well as a small bowl of porridge and a cup of coffee. Post training, it’s a protein shake and carbohydrate drink and did express how important it is for him to consume this within the “25 minute window” post finishing his training session.

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Half Marathon – 4 Race Prediction Workouts

Half Marathon – 4 Race Prediction Workouts

Training for the Half Marathon and want to know what your race pace should be?

Below you’ll find 4 Half Marathon race indicator workouts to estimate your Half Marathon performance. You should already have a vague idea as to what shape you’re in for the Half Marathon, but these workouts are good tests for you to complete in training to hopefully give you some confidence leading into race day.

Keep in mind that these workouts are just an estimate as to what shape you’re in. Don’t take them too seriously and remember that a real Half Marathon race is the true indication of your Half Marathon shape! These are just challenges you can complete in training and are excellent fitness boosters leading into a race, as they are very specific to the event of the Half Marathon.

All of these workouts (or close derivatives of them) have been used by professional runners leading into major Half Marathon races.

3 x 4km @ between 10km and Half Marathon pace, with 1km floating recovery about 10-15% slower.

This 14km (8.7mi) continuous run is a good indicator of Half Marathon shape and very similar sessions are used by many Kenyan and Ethiopian running squads. The pace that you can average for the 14km training run is right around the pace you should be able to race a Half Marathon at, given good conditions and fresh legs.

It’s three 4km repeats slightly slower than your 10km goal pace (with just 1 km recovery, but the key is to make the recovery brisk; about 10-15% slower than your repetition speed.

For someone aiming at a 1:10 Half Marathon (3:19/km or 5:20/mi), we assume a 10km personal best of around 31:30 which is 3:09/km. Your repetitions should be at around 3:15/km pace (4km in ≈13:00) and your 1km recoveries should be around 3:35-3:40/km.

For someone with a goal of a 1:15 Half Marathon (3:33/km, 5:43/mi): 4km reps @ ≈3:25/km and 1km recoveries @ ≈3:55-4:00/km.

For someone with a goal of a 1:20 Half Marathon (3:47/km, 6:05/mi): 4km reps @ ≈3:37/km and 1km recoveries @ ≈4:15-4:20/km.

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Sondre Moen – 2:05:48 Marathon Training

Sondre Moen – 2:05:48 Marathon Training

“In 2016 I became a full-time athlete and in September of that year I started to be coached by Renato Canova, which I believe were two key factors in my journey to running a sub-one-hour half marathon in Valencia.

Before working with Renato, I was self-coached for a year and while I had the knowledge to run a 2:10 or 2:11 marathon, I did not possess the knowledge my coach does of the specific sessions to run faster. My training programme has changed a lot under Renato and under his regime I run faster on my daily runs and I have two to three days behind hard workouts whereas in the past my hard workouts were always every second day. It took a while to adapt to my new training regime and I found at first I spent a lot of time sleeping to recover.
But over time my performances in the training group improved to the point that Abel Kirui (the two-time world champion) was the only guy in front of me ahead of sessions. This filled me lots of confidence as did running my first ever sub-eight minute 3000m. Now, I know to run a sub-eight-minute 3000m is not so special but my previous best was 8:01 set when I was 19 and it was a barrier I wanted to break. Last July I ran a meet in Nembro, Italy, expecting to maybe run 7:58. I had done no specific preparation for the race but I ran 7:52.55 – it was an important breakthrough for me. In September I ran 27:55 for eighth in a 10km in Prague and this gave me the belief I could run a 60:30 half-marathon in Valencia the following month.
That day I ran at a smooth pace and passed 10km in 27:56 – only one second slower than I had ran for that distance in Prague. Three guys moved ahead and I found from 11km on I was running my own. But the pace remained consistent. I ran the race without a watch but at 15km I saw the time and I thought I had a chance of beating one-hour. For the rest of the race I tried to relax as much as possible and maintain my rhythm. To cross the line in 59:48 was in some ways even a bigger achievement then my 2:05 European record time when winning the Fukuoka Marathon in December. To run just under an hour is a major landmark and as significant as running a 3:59 mile compared to that of a 4:01 mile.”

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6 Marathon Lactate Threshold Training Workouts

6 Marathon Lactate Threshold Training Workouts

(3) 2 to 5 x 1600/3200 Meter Compound Sets

Here is a marathon lactate threshold training compound set that you can do on the track or road. The track will make it easier to judge distance, but you really don’t need to hit exact distances with this one, so you could also estimate a 1 mile/2 mile sequence on the road.

Workout: Run 1600 meters or one mile at 10K pace and then slow to marathon pace for 3200 meters or 2 miles. Start with two set early in your cycle and gradually increase to 3 sets for an intermediate runner or 5 sets for a highly experienced runner. Recover with 3-5 minutes of rest between each compound set (3mins if you’re experienced, 5mins if you’re just getting started).

(4) 1/2/3 Mile Compound Set

This is a tough marathon lactate threshold run that will elevate your ability to run at race pace when fatigued.

Description: Start with 1 mile at 5K pace. Then slow to 10K pace for the next two miles before finishing this 6 mile training run with 3 miles at goal marathon pace. Start with one set. The truly adventurous could advance to two sets.

(5) Marathon Variety Run

I always like to run in different locations, especially during longer distance marathon training. Here is a workout that uses both the road and the track.

Workout: Start with 2 miles (3.2km) on the road at goal marathon pace. Then hit the track for 1 mile (1600m) at 10K pace. Head back out on the road for 2 more miles at goal marathon pace before heading back to the track for another mile at 10K pace. Next do another 2 miles at marathon pace on the road and then hit the track for 800 meters. Do the first 400 meters at 5K pace and the last 400 meters as fast as you can manage. Total distance in this workout is 8.5 miles.

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