fbpx
Eliud Kipchoge’s Preparation For The INEOS 159 Challenge

Eliud Kipchoge’s Preparation For The INEOS 159 Challenge

Following this build up period the group shifted back into their normal training cycle, which we explore in more detail in Eliud Kipchoge – a typical week of training but is summarised by Patrick Sang, Eliud’s coach, in the second part of the documentary. The training week can be summarised as: Tuesday – track or fartlek, Thursday – long run, Saturday – fartlek, other days – easy. A notable addition to this training is the core work that can be seen in the videos. It is also interesting that it appears that Eliud is now using nutrition during some of the sessions, handed to him from the team van… this was not something that we observed during our time with him in 2017 in the lead-up to Berlin. 

Sang is interviewed at great length throughout the three parts of the documentary, discussing his relationship with Eliud and how it has transformed over the years, admitting that much of the time he now feels that he is a student of Eliud himself. The reverence that all involved with the project have for Eliud is clearly discernible, his self-belief is inspiring and a major focus of the videos.

When discussing Eliud’s nervousness regarding his performance and the pressure he is under, Eliud’s manager Valentijn Trouw says that “He wants to do it for himself, but at the same time he wants to do it for everyone that is involved in the event and everybody who believes in him.” His teammates clearly believe the barrier is within his grasp, when asked to predict his time, assuming all goes perfectly on the day, some respond that he could even go 1:58-low.

read more
The Importance Of “The Long Run”

The Importance Of “The Long Run”

What is the perfect long run training distance for marathoners?

There is no “perfect” distance. 32km (20 miles) is the peak distance used in most training programs, however many elite runners will run 35km or longer on 3 or 4 occasions leading into a marathon. Most coaches feel that once you reach 25km (16 miles)  you’re in long run territory. That’s the point where the psychological changes Vaughan mentioned kick in. But a few coaches prefer talking “time” rather than distance, “hours” rather than kilometres/miles.

Running much further than 35km in training increases the risk of injury, especially for those new to running. Many experienced coaches argue that running further than 40km for seasoned and elite runners is not necessary and again, increases the chances of injury.

It’s well known in the elite running world that some Japanese runners do 5+ hour runs when building up for a marathon. Former world record holder Robert de Castella and Steve Monaghetti from Australia would peak with a 48km (30 miles) run 5 weeks before the marathon, but that’s after steady diet of 35-40km runs nearly every weekend leading in. Most runners would self destruct on that much mileage.

Marathon World Record holder Eliud Kipchoge completes his long runs on Thursdays and alternates 30km one week with 40km the next and does 12 weeks of this 2 week cycle before a marathon, meaning he will complete 6 40km runs before a marathon.

Mo Farah is similar – peaking at 40km runs 4-8 weeks before the targeted marathon.

read more
Renato Canova – Elite Marathon Coach – Training Philosophy Summarised (Part 2)

Renato Canova – Elite Marathon Coach – Training Philosophy Summarised (Part 2)

Fundamental Period: 6 weeks

Long Run @ 80% of Marathon Pace 

Frequency: once every 2 weeks.
Type: continuous run at even pace.
Duration: 2:00-3:00.
Goal: to improve the adaptation of the body structure and to get used to time on feet. Training doesn’t have to have a direct influence on the performance, but it is fundamental to training for the marathon.
Training general resistance.
This is setting the base to handle the overall volume of long efforts to come. Pace should be relaxed and not strenuous.

Long Run @ 85-87% of Marathon Pace

Frequency: once every 2 weeks.
Type: continuous run at even pace.
Duration: 1:30-2:00.
Goal: to improve the utilisation of fatty acids and biomechanic efficiency with increased fatigue. This is the link between the General and the Specific periods.
Training aerobic resistance.
This is a bit shorter and bit more uptempo run compared to the longer long run.

read more
Renato Canova – Elite Marathon Coach – Training Philosophy Summarised (Part 1)

Renato Canova – Elite Marathon Coach – Training Philosophy Summarised (Part 1)

In September 2017, world famous distance running coach Renato Canova shared his training philosophies in a stand up presentation in Valencia. Canova’s training methodology has influenced a large proportion of the elite marathon performances in the last 3 decades. He spoke in depth about the structure of marathon training and gives examples of specific duration and workouts. Below you will find a  summary of his presentation with specific take aways for those interested in implementing ideas into their own training.

There are four periods of training that Canova talks about:
1. Transition Period (4 weeks post Marathon)
2. General Period (4 weeks duration)
3. Fundamental Period (6 weeks duration)
4. Specific Period (10 weeks duration)

This article focuses on the first 2 periods – the Transition Period and the General Period.

read more
Eliud Kipchoge’s Preparation For The INEOS 159 Challenge

Eliud Kipchoge’s Preparation For The INEOS 159 Challenge

Following this build up period the group shifted back into their normal training cycle, which we explore in more detail in Eliud Kipchoge – a typical week of training but is summarised by Patrick Sang, Eliud’s coach, in the second part of the documentary. The training week can be summarised as: Tuesday – track or fartlek, Thursday – long run, Saturday – fartlek, other days – easy. A notable addition to this training is the core work that can be seen in the videos. It is also interesting that it appears that Eliud is now using nutrition during some of the sessions, handed to him from the team van… this was not something that we observed during our time with him in 2017 in the lead-up to Berlin. 

Sang is interviewed at great length throughout the three parts of the documentary, discussing his relationship with Eliud and how it has transformed over the years, admitting that much of the time he now feels that he is a student of Eliud himself. The reverence that all involved with the project have for Eliud is clearly discernible, his self-belief is inspiring and a major focus of the videos.

When discussing Eliud’s nervousness regarding his performance and the pressure he is under, Eliud’s manager Valentijn Trouw says that “He wants to do it for himself, but at the same time he wants to do it for everyone that is involved in the event and everybody who believes in him.” His teammates clearly believe the barrier is within his grasp, when asked to predict his time, assuming all goes perfectly on the day, some respond that he could even go 1:58-low.

read more
The Importance Of “The Long Run”

The Importance Of “The Long Run”

What is the perfect long run training distance for marathoners?

There is no “perfect” distance. 32km (20 miles) is the peak distance used in most training programs, however many elite runners will run 35km or longer on 3 or 4 occasions leading into a marathon. Most coaches feel that once you reach 25km (16 miles)  you’re in long run territory. That’s the point where the psychological changes Vaughan mentioned kick in. But a few coaches prefer talking “time” rather than distance, “hours” rather than kilometres/miles.

Running much further than 35km in training increases the risk of injury, especially for those new to running. Many experienced coaches argue that running further than 40km for seasoned and elite runners is not necessary and again, increases the chances of injury.

It’s well known in the elite running world that some Japanese runners do 5+ hour runs when building up for a marathon. Former world record holder Robert de Castella and Steve Monaghetti from Australia would peak with a 48km (30 miles) run 5 weeks before the marathon, but that’s after steady diet of 35-40km runs nearly every weekend leading in. Most runners would self destruct on that much mileage.

Marathon World Record holder Eliud Kipchoge completes his long runs on Thursdays and alternates 30km one week with 40km the next and does 12 weeks of this 2 week cycle before a marathon, meaning he will complete 6 40km runs before a marathon.

Mo Farah is similar – peaking at 40km runs 4-8 weeks before the targeted marathon.

read more
Renato Canova – Elite Marathon Coach – Training Philosophy Summarised (Part 2)

Renato Canova – Elite Marathon Coach – Training Philosophy Summarised (Part 2)

Fundamental Period: 6 weeks

Long Run @ 80% of Marathon Pace 

Frequency: once every 2 weeks.
Type: continuous run at even pace.
Duration: 2:00-3:00.
Goal: to improve the adaptation of the body structure and to get used to time on feet. Training doesn’t have to have a direct influence on the performance, but it is fundamental to training for the marathon.
Training general resistance.
This is setting the base to handle the overall volume of long efforts to come. Pace should be relaxed and not strenuous.

Long Run @ 85-87% of Marathon Pace

Frequency: once every 2 weeks.
Type: continuous run at even pace.
Duration: 1:30-2:00.
Goal: to improve the utilisation of fatty acids and biomechanic efficiency with increased fatigue. This is the link between the General and the Specific periods.
Training aerobic resistance.
This is a bit shorter and bit more uptempo run compared to the longer long run.

read more
Renato Canova – Elite Marathon Coach – Training Philosophy Summarised (Part 1)

Renato Canova – Elite Marathon Coach – Training Philosophy Summarised (Part 1)

In September 2017, world famous distance running coach Renato Canova shared his training philosophies in a stand up presentation in Valencia. Canova’s training methodology has influenced a large proportion of the elite marathon performances in the last 3 decades. He spoke in depth about the structure of marathon training and gives examples of specific duration and workouts. Below you will find a  summary of his presentation with specific take aways for those interested in implementing ideas into their own training.

There are four periods of training that Canova talks about:
1. Transition Period (4 weeks post Marathon)
2. General Period (4 weeks duration)
3. Fundamental Period (6 weeks duration)
4. Specific Period (10 weeks duration)

This article focuses on the first 2 periods – the Transition Period and the General Period.

read more
Mo Farah: 9 Running Tips

Mo Farah: 9 Running Tips

For A Quick Energy Boost… “Chocolate – usually dark chocolate – is good for an energy boost. There are all manner of sports snacks that pretend to do wonderful things, but I mostly like to stick to the basics.”

How to Keep Motivated… “When you’re competing, keep reminding yourself how much work has led to that moment. The training you’ve done means you deserve to perform well. That gives a huge confidence boost.”

How Important Are Recovery Days? “The day after a tough workout, you never want to push your body again. The most you should do is a comfortable run (or two) and/or cross training. Don’t have your heart rate up high again.”

read more
Lesson #5: Train Your Mind – Alberto Salazar (World Famous Coach)

Lesson #5: Train Your Mind – Alberto Salazar (World Famous Coach)

“You might not be competing against top runners from East Africa anytime soon, but you can, and should, work on your mental game. Remain relentlessly positive and focus on the things you can control in training and racing rather than be rattled by the things you can’t. And last but certainly not least, have confidence in yourself and your abilities when you step on the starting line. Without that key component, none of the other stuff really matters all that much.”

read more
Mo Farah: 9 Running Tips

Mo Farah: 9 Running Tips

For A Quick Energy Boost… “Chocolate – usually dark chocolate – is good for an energy boost. There are all manner of sports snacks that pretend to do wonderful things, but I mostly like to stick to the basics.”

How to Keep Motivated… “When you’re competing, keep reminding yourself how much work has led to that moment. The training you’ve done means you deserve to perform well. That gives a huge confidence boost.”

How Important Are Recovery Days? “The day after a tough workout, you never want to push your body again. The most you should do is a comfortable run (or two) and/or cross training. Don’t have your heart rate up high again.”

read more
Lesson #5: Train Your Mind – Alberto Salazar (World Famous Coach)

Lesson #5: Train Your Mind – Alberto Salazar (World Famous Coach)

“You might not be competing against top runners from East Africa anytime soon, but you can, and should, work on your mental game. Remain relentlessly positive and focus on the things you can control in training and racing rather than be rattled by the things you can’t. And last but certainly not least, have confidence in yourself and your abilities when you step on the starting line. Without that key component, none of the other stuff really matters all that much.”

read more

Subscriber? Login here to unlock all articles!

X

Forgot Password?

Join Us