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LEARN THE TRAINING METHODS OF THE WORLD’S BEST ATHLETES

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Why Run Easy? Here Are The Benefits Of Easy Running

Why Run Easy? Here Are The Benefits Of Easy Running

alent can take you far, but as many elite runners can tell you, talent is nothing without the commitment to train hard. Most of the best middle to long distance runners in the world frequently log 160km (100 miles) per week that consists of threshold runs, intervals, fartlek, hill work and continuous short, medium and long runs. No pain, no gain, right? Not exactly.A significant percentage of most elite athletes’ training logs consist of easy running; that is running at speeds less than 1 minute per/km (or 1.5mins/mile) slower than their 10km race pace. This effort “aerobic running” is done right around 70% (give or take 5%) of the maximum heart beat count per minute and at this effort, runners should be able to have a conversation.“The most common mistake most runners make is that they think if they’re running easily then they’re not getting much benefit,” says Brian Rosetti, a running coach in New York City and founder of the Run SMART Project. That couldn’t be more off-base because easy (or sexy pace) running comes with a laundry list of benefits.

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Altitude Training – Why, When And How To Get High (Part 2)

Altitude Training – Why, When And How To Get High (Part 2)

During a short stay at altitude it will be tempting to cram in as many hard workouts as possible to reap the benefits for which you’ve travelled so far. Many athletes fall into the trap of working too hard, too soon. This can overstress the immune system, interfering with the generation of red blood cells and leaving you flat and low on energy. For the initial days at elevation cut back on mileage and stick to easy runs, it’s important to go easy as the body is already subjected to significant stress. If flying from sea level to a significant enough elevation (generally over 2500m), altitude sickness is a real risk – and, importantly, aerobic fitness isn’t a protective factor. Watch out for developments of nausea, headache, trouble sleeping or significant shortness of breath. To start with, focus on feeling, not pace. Pay heed to your perceived level of exertion. It may feel like you’re struggling to even handle a crawling pace, this is a normal part of the adaptation to altitude. If you finish an easy run feeling like you’ve just run a hard race you should be cutting back. Make sure to keep pace easy and only progress to faster workouts after around a week of adaptation.

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Altitude Training – Why, When And How To Get High (Part 1)

Altitude Training – Why, When And How To Get High (Part 1)

The effects of training at altitude on athletic performance have undergone much scrutiny in recent decades. Many athletes who have dominated the domain of long distance running have spent their lives living and training at altitude – notably the East Africans in Kenya, Ethiopia and Uganda who almost exclusively come from high elevations. And since the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City, which took place at 2200 metres above sea level, the vast majority of medallists at major championships have either lived or trained at altitude. Here we will look at the effects of altitude training on the body, why athletes incorporate it into their training regimes, and how you should go about trying it out for yourself. Nowadays, altitude training is a component of virtually all elite running programs. Many elites are flocking to elevated hubs such as Flagstaff, Boulder, and lesser known spots in Kenya, Ethiopia and Mexico. But what is it about running at altitude that can give such a boost to athletic performance?

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Threshold Training – Finding Your Correct Threshold Pace

Threshold Training – Finding Your Correct Threshold Pace

Threshold, or T-pace, running is one of the most productive types of training that distance runners can do. Training at this pace helps runners avoid overtraining and yields more satisfying workouts and better consistency.

The two types of threshold training that I discuss in Daniels’ Running Formula are tempo runs and cruise intervals. Tempo runs—steady, moderately prolonged runs—have been around for some time, but runners and coaches define them differently. Cruise intervals are a series of repeated runs with a brief recovery between runs. In my book, I address the differences and similarities between tempo and cruise-interval workouts. Here, I’ll stick to tempo runs, including new information on extended tempo runs.

Some runners and coaches use tempo runs for the broader purpose of just going for a fairly prolonged, steady, solid run—often, more for the psychological benefits (which can be considerable) than the physiological. With threshold-intensity running, the physiological benefit is to improve endurance: the ability to endure a greater and greater intensity of effort for a longer and longer period of time. You might perform some (longer) tempo runs at an intensity slightly below threshold intensity, which offers a good opportunity to boost psychological endurance. Longer tempo runs that begin in the less intense area of the zone and progress to the higher end of the zone are accomplishing both the benefits of a longer tempo run and the benefits of true T-pace running.

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The 3 Key’s To Eliud Kipchoge’s Training

The 3 Key’s To Eliud Kipchoge’s Training

Cohesiveness – Eliud and his training partners live most of the year in the training camp outside Eldoret, living apart from family and other friends for much of the time. This means that they rely on each other for support. They push each other in training and they spend the time between training recovering together. The environment that this fosters is an extremely positive one. There is a comfortable camaraderie between the athletes and they so clearly enjoy their own company. This means that the sessions are often kept very fun and light-hearted even when the prescribed workout is far from enjoyable. Having such a training environment evidently is very motivating for the group and helps to prevent burnout, taking away stress and meaning that training becomes more gratifying for the whole group.      

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Running Twice A Day  – What’s The Point?

Running Twice A Day – What’s The Point?

“Cumulative mileage matters–no matter how you do it,” says Brad Hudson of Hudson Elite Marathon Performance in Boulder, Colorado. You can boost your total miles by doubling once a week–and still keep a rest day. Four to 10 hours after a key workout like an interval session or a tempo run, go for an easy 20- to 45-minute run, and don’t fret about pace. This will boost mileage and aid recovery from the first workout by increasing blood flow to the muscles and flushing out lactic acid and other metabolic waste products. The result? Fresher legs for your next run.

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Marathon Specific Training: Five 35km+ Brutal Training Sessions By Elites

Marathon Specific Training: Five 35km+ Brutal Training Sessions By Elites

Sondre Moen – 2:05:48 Marathoner. 36km Training Session. 30km continuous run, consisting of 2km at Marathon pace + 1km 15% slower than Marathon pace for the full 30km. For Moen, this means 2km @ 3:00-3:05/km, 1km @ 3:20-3:25/km 10 times through. Moen would do this workout at 2000m+ altitude in Kenya. Include a 3km warm up and cool down, this makes for a 36km training day and 30km of it fast!

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Marathon Specific Training – 5 Long Interval Sessions Used By Elites

Marathon Specific Training – 5 Long Interval Sessions Used By Elites

Workout: 6km, 5km, 4km, 3km, 2km, 1km at Marathon Pace Recovery: 1km @ 15% slower than goal Marathon pace.At minimum you should be aiming to complete all repetitions at your goal Marathon pace, but ideally you should try to increase the pace in the final 3km, 2km and 1km reps to being slightly faster than goal Marathon pace, towards your Half Marathon pace.Between each interval, the recovery is 1km at 15% slower than your Marathon Pace (approx 30-45 seconds).

The continuous run totals 26km and 21km of it at your goal Marathon Pace or faster.

This training session is used by Renato Canova with most of his Marathoners in the build up to a key race.

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Eliud Kipchoge – The Greatest Of All Time – 3 Key Training Sessions

Eliud Kipchoge – The Greatest Of All Time – 3 Key Training Sessions

The majority of the running that Kipchoge does is easy. Runs where he’s barely puffing and cruising along with a low heart rate in an aerobic state. This doesn’t mean that it’s ‘slow’ however, with a lot of these aerobic runs having sections run at around 3:45min/km… factor in the hills, dirt roads and 2400m altitude and that is exceptional. However, when compared to the three workouts that take place each week, it’s clear that he’s still cruising even in these runs which can go up to a half-marathon in distance.

So, what are the three workouts he does each week? They vary a bit, but they follow a very similar pattern.

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Diet of Ethiopian Athletes

Diet of Ethiopian Athletes

Interestingly, meat consumption seemed to have a positive correlation with the stature of the athlete. For athletes who were not under management and hadn’t won many races, meat was an expensive luxury, and they ate a diet much more grounded in vegetables and grains. Whereas athletes who had been more successful and had a higher income, much higher levels of meat were consumed. Eating whole plates of goat meat was a status symbol and eating the finest cuts of raw steak was reserved for celebrations: Kenenisa Bekele’s coach treated us, along with some of his other athletes, to raw meat on Ethiopian Christmas Day.

So, what is it that they are mainly eating? There are several staples which most meals seem to revolve around….

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Maurten – Eliud Kipchoge’s, Mo Farah’s And Kenenisa Bekele’s Fuel Of Choice

Maurten – Eliud Kipchoge’s, Mo Farah’s And Kenenisa Bekele’s Fuel Of Choice

Question: what do Eliud Kipchoge, Mo Farah and Kenenisa Bekele have in common, aside from being fairly quick? Answer: Maurten!

The above list is not exhaustive, a slew of top athletes consume Maurten during races and games: Galen Rupp, Geoffrey Kamworor, Burhany Legese, Desiree Linden, Vivian Cheruiyot, Jan Frodeno and even the English Premier League side Tottenham Hotspur.

So how did this Swedish start-up come to be the fuel of choice for these superstars? Maurten claim that the secret behind their success is their patented hydrogel technology. This has allowed them to make great strides in the delivery of carbohydrates during exercise, without the gastrointestinal issues caused by other sports energy products.

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